Donald J. Patti

Posts Tagged ‘advice’

When Taking Over Means “Steady as She Goes”

In Business, leadership, management, project management, Small Business on 15 November 2009 at 8:00 pm

You’ve taken a new leadership position, so you’re ready to take charge and make your mark. There’s just one problem – all’s well. The division you’ve inherited is running smoothly, or the project you’ve taken over is on target. What do you do? Here’s how to tell you’re in this leadership situation, and what to do if you are.

Confirming All’s Well

Because leadership changes usually occur when change is needed, it may be difficult to tell that nothing is wrong. But there are a number of indicators that appear when everything is just fine. If you answer “yes” to most of these questions, you’ve probably inherited a steady ship:

  1. Your predecessor retired. While some people are forced in to retirement and not all recent retirees were good leaders, it’s a good sign that all was managed well if your predecessor retired in the position.
  2. Your predecessor held the position for more than 10 years. Particularly in disciplines like information technology and marketing, ten years is a mark of seasoned leadership. While times may have changed and forced a change in leadership, it’s a good sign that your predecessor enjoyed the position enough to stay in it for a decade or more.
  3. Turnover was low. You’ve talked to the staff below the prior leader and they average five years or more with the company. This means the prior leader knew how to hire and retain the right people for their positions.
  4. The numbers are good. Whether the key performance measures for the division are customer satisfaction, profit-per-unit-sold or days-ahead-of-schedule, the key measures all look good, especially after some independent validation confirms they’re accurate.
  5. You’re allowed to phone your predecessor. When both sides haven’t parted on good terms, it’s rare that you’re allowed to pick up the phone and call your predecessor. When you ask, “Do you mind if I give the prior manager a call?” an answer of “yes” with no cautions or caveats is a good sign.
  6. The echo of kind words. In initial conversations about your predecessor and their work, co-workers and subordinates speak fondly of them and readily point to past successes.

If you’ve responded, “yes” to 4 of 6 of the indicators above or more, there’s a very good chance you’re inheriting a well run division or team that needs few short-term changes. The next section describes how to lead in this situation.

An Even Keel

Once you’ve confirmed that all is well, you have quite a management challenge ahead of you. (Yes, that’s correct – a challenge). Your predecessor was well liked, the team performed well, and you have to do at least as well for the transition to be considered successful. Here’s what you should and should not do:

  1. Give credit. Once you’ve confirmed prior success, give credit to your predecessor and the team, noting that you respect what they’ve already accomplished. This is more than phony ego-stroking, it’s confirmation for your staff that you knew can properly assess a business situation and take the correct actions moving forward. They’ll appreciate that you’re recognizing them, but they’ll respect your business intuition even more.
  2. Avoid radical change. While it’s very tempting, do not try to transform the organization to suit your own management style and don’t attempt a major reorganization. It’s likely to cause resentment by your co-workers and subordinates who were very happy with the way things were. Even worse, it may turn a productive team into an unproductive one.
  3. Make change slowly. An obvious converse of the prior point, if some changes are necessary, make them slowly. This will give people an opportunity to know and trust you, but it will also give you time to understand why the team was so successful in the past. After a little wait, you may find that some of the changes you’ve planned aren’t needed and it will definitely put the distance of time between you and your predecessor.
  4. Learn from the management style of your predecessor. They were successful sitting in the same chair you now hold – who better to study than them? Review old reports and deliverables, review performance results going a few years back, and see how the division ran in the past.
  5. Give them a call. Invite your predecessor to lunch and ask them what worked so well. What management style did they use, what methodologies or techniques. Also, if possible, ask them about your staff – what are their likes and dislikes, what makes team members tick, who doesn’t get along with whom? In a couple of hours, you’ll be a lot closer to making a smooth transition.
  6. Review goals, then consider more ambitious ones. It’s possible your predecessor already set some pretty solid target for the team, but there’s also a very good chance that the bar has been a little too low most recently. If this is the case, raise expectations a bit, work with the team to identify new opportunities to excel, then add them to your strategic plan. By doing so, you’re most likely to add value to an already good situation.
  7. Adjust. While it may not be YOUR management style, your predecessor’s approach worked well. Consider adopting all or part of it, even if it’s a stretch for you. You may find that you grow as a leader by adding arrows to your quiver in this way.

Same Crew, More Knots

As a manager and leader, taking on a successful team may be the most challenging experience you ever face. It’s likely you’re a leader because you can take charge in difficult times to steer a new course, but the winds of change simply aren’t blowing. In this case, the most prudent course is to learn from the successes of the past and adapt to the new team. It will take longer, but eventually your team will improve upon past successes. If nothing else, resist the temptation to immediately set a new course – ironically, you’re far more likely to fail.

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